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The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)

is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession.

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    Headlines from AIAA AVIATION 2014

    Headlines from AIAA AVIATION 2014

     

     

     

    Watch recorded sessions on AIAA's Live Streaming Channel >

     

    Friday, 20 June 2014, 5:15 p.m. EDT

    Aeronautics technology development: Time to pick up the pace

    by Janice Saylor

     

    Aeronautics_technology_development_panelThe message from the Friday morning plenary panel at AVIATION 2014 is that change does not happen rapidly in aerospace. As the FAA’s Steve Bradford put it, “Your good ideas from today will take seven years to research, seven years to develop, and then [will be] deployed in years 14 to 20, and you’ll be right on the cusp of that final step in year 20.” Bradford is chief scientist, architecture and NextGEN development, at the FAA’s Office of the Chief Scientist.

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    Friday, 20 June 2014, 12:35 p.m. EDT

    NASA plans faster, open-minded aeronautics research

    by Ben Iannotta

     

    Aeronautics-Research-Strategy-Vision-Panel-20Jun14NASA is in the process of realigning its aeronautics research operations to bring a renewed focus on X-planes and accelerate progress toward overland supersonic combustion, cleaner-burning engines, alternative fuels and breakthroughs in detect-and-avoid technologies for unmanned craft.

    Those are among the goals laid out in NASA’s “Aeronautics Research Strategy Vision” released in August 2013. The four NASA officials whose jobs will be to make that vision a reality appeared Friday on the panel, “NASA Aeronautics Vision for the 21st Century.”

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    Thursday, 19 June 2014, 9:45 p.m. EDT

    Pushing through the hurdles of low altitude flight

    by Jessa Foor

     

    Billion_Dollar_Aerospace_Industry_PanelWe are in a very exciting time for those involved in the commercialization of low altitude vehicles. Within the next 1-5 years, full integration into the commercial airspace will happen. As knowledge of the benefits of these technologies advances among early adopters, there is increased public interest and rising demand among large commercial businesses. So what’s the biggest roadblock? Regulation, of course.

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    Thursday, 19 June 2014, 4:15 p.m. EDT

    NextGen on course to make aviation safer and cleaner

    by Duane Hyland

     

    Michael Whitaker FAA Dep Admin“Next Generation [NextGen] air traffic control technology transforms how we look at and manage air traffic,” said Michael Whitaker, deputy administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, addressing a capacity audience at AIAA’s AVIATION 2014 Forum. Speaking on “NextGen Implementation: Challenge and Opportunities in an International Context,” Whitaker discussed where NextGen implementation stands now, some of the challenges it still faces, and how the system helps reduce cost, noise and environmental pollution.

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    Thursday, 19 June 2014, 3:30 p.m. EDT

    'Tough decisions' ahead for NextGen

    by Ben Iannotta

     

    MajGen_EdBolton-USAFRet_19Jun2014Budget cuts to the FAA’s NextGen air traffic management modernization program over the past few years are beginning to take a toll, and in response FAA officials are seeking to protect core NextGen projects, a senior FAA official said Thursday. One of those core projects is FAA’s effort to ensure communications compatibility with whatever system Europe chooses to deploy after completing research under the Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research project, or SESAR.

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    Thursday, 19 June 2014, 9:00 a.m. EDT

    Partnering with governments for UAS success

    by Duane Hyland

     

    Creating_Successful_commercial_UAS_Business_Panel_18Jun14The message from the Wednesday afternoon panel, “Creating a Successful Commercial UAS Business Environment: Challenges and Opportunities,” is that if unmanned aerial systems – UAS – are to thrive in the U.S., the federal government, state governments, and the private sector will have to work together to achieve that goal. As the industry faces a host of issues from airspace integration to privacy law to emerging technologies and safety questions, no one entity can go it alone.

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    Wednesday, 18 June 2014, 4:00 p.m. EDT

    Collective effort needed to tackle aviation's challenges

    by Lawrence Garrett

     

    Axel_Krein_LittlewoodLectureThe issues and challenges facing today’s aviation industry can’t be solved “just by one company, by one country,” said Axel Krein, senior vice president, research and technology, Airbus, during Tuesday evening’s William Littlewood Memorial Lecture. They can “be solved only together,” he said, adding that this week’s AIAA 2014 Aviation Forum and Exposition is an excellent opportunity to bring industry members together for the purpose of “exchanging and defining solutions for tomorrow.”

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    Wednesday, 18 June 2014, 2:55 p.m. EDT

    FAA: New tech, fuels necessary for cleaner future

    by Ben Iannotta

     

    Carl_Burelson_18Jun14The navigation improvements being rolled out under the FAA’s NextGen initiative won’t by themselves bring the industry in line with the ambitious carbon reduction goals for aviation laid out in a 2012 policy statement, the FAA’s Carl Burleson told an audience at AVIATION 2014 Wednesday. Burleson said improvements in engine technology and alternative fuels will also be needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 2005 levels by 2020 and “then reduce them thereafter, all while allowing the system to grow.”

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    Wednesday, 18 June 2014, 1:15 p.m. EDT

    Supply chains: Quality is job 1

    by Duane Hyland

     

    AviationSupplyChainPanel_18June14When you think aerospace, you think engines, wings and planes; you don’t normally think about the way all of the parts got there. But you should. Supply chains are a critical part of aerospace – if they don’t work, nothing works. That was the message from today’s panel on “Global Supply Chain Challenges and Opportunities” at the AIAA AVIATION 2014 Forum in Atlanta, Ga. Moderating the hour-long discussion was Trevor Stansbury, president of Supply Dynamics.

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    Wednesday, 18 June 2014, 8:10 a.m. EDT

    Unmanned test site winners pledge cooperation

    by Ben Iannotta

     

    UASTestSitesPanelJust six months after engaging in a fierce national competition to be named one of the nation’s official unmanned aircraft test sites, representatives of the six winning organizations gathered on stage Tuesday to strike a note of research cooperation in the drive to open the national airspace to unmanned planes.

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    Tuesday, 17 June 2014, 2:10 p.m. EDT

    Brazilian, Chinese experts discuss aviation trends

    by Ben Iannotta

     

    Brazil-China_panel_17Jun14Brazil and China plan to grow their aerospace industries by supporting their industries and academia, and some of those plans were discussed during the session, “Perspectives from Brazil and China.” One panelist ventured a bold prediction about the possible use of unmanned aircraft in civil aviation. Brazil’s Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, ITA, plans to double its size “to offer very good engineering for the launching and space industry in the country,” said Carlos Americo Pacheco, the school’s rector.

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    Tuesday, 17 June 2014, 1:45 p.m. EDT

    Integrating the world’s air transportation systems

    by Duane Hyland

     

    interoperability_of_NextGen_Panel_17Jun14If we want to have smarter, cleaner and safer aircraft operations throughout the global aviation enterprise, we will have to find the political will to work together to implement the technological systems that will make those goals a reality: That was the message of the morning panel on international integration and Interoperability at the AIAA AVIATION 2014 Forum in Atlanta, Ga. Aerospace America editor-in-chief Ben Iannotta moderated the panel, which focused on the barriers that prevent full interoperability of next-generation air traffic control technology and safety measures.

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    Tuesday, 17 June 2014, 10:55 a.m. EDT

    Eye on tomorrow’s leaders

    by Stephen Brock

     

    Transformative Aerospace System Analysis Panel 16Jun14The Monday evening Rising Leaders in Aerospace Forum offered younger professionals and students an opportunity to learn how to get involved in AIAA. Ben Marcionna of Lockheed Martin moderated the panel, which was part of AIAA’s AVIATION 2014 forum in Atlanta, Ga. Other panel members were Kathleen Atkins of Lockheed Martin, Russ Cummings of the U.S. Air Force Academy, and Cees Bil of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. The group shared stories of how they first became acquainted with AIAA and how their experiences with the group have helped them.

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    Tuesday, 17 June 2014, 9:20 a.m. EDT

    Moving computational fluid dynamics analysis forward

    by Duane Hyland

     

    Transformative Aerospace System Analysis Panel 16Jun14Does computational fluid dynamics still have a place in aerospace analysis? The answer from a panel of experts gathered at AIAA’s AVIATION 2014 Forum in Atlanta, Ga., was “yes, but we have to improve it.” How to improve it, the methods to be used, and the various futures of CFD-based research sparked debate before the capacity crowd gathered in the session room on Monday afternoon.

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    Tuesday, 17 June 2014, 8:30 a.m. EDT

    Aviation industry vital to U.S. economy

    by Lawrence Garrett

     

    Aviation Challenges PanelThe importance of the aviation industry, not only to the state of Georgia but also to the U.S. economy, was the focus of a Monday morning panel discussion at AIAA’s AVIATION Forum, taking place this week in Atlanta, Ga. The panel, called “Aviation’s Challenges & Opportunities – Georgia’s Global Perspectives,” included three industry representatives.

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    Monday, 16 June 2014, 12:30 p.m. EDT

    F-35 Joint Strike Fighter: Strategic necessity and economic powerhouse

    by Duane Hyland

     

    CarvalhoThe F-35 Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter is not just an extremely effective warfighting machine but also a robust engine of economic growth for the U.S. and its international partners, said Orlando Carvalho, executive vice president of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, addressing a standing-room-only audience this morning in Atlanta, Ga. Carvalho was delivering the keynote speech at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ AVIATION 2014 forum.

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