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The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)

is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession.

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    Paper Submission

    Paper Submission Information

    Technical Program 


    The technical program will feature technical paper and poster presentations structured around 15 technical tracks. Nowhere else will you get the depth and breadth of sessions and information-sharing on space systems, technologies, and programs! AIAA is soliciting abstracts for paper or poster presentations on the following technical topics:

     

    Commercial Space
    Intelligent Systems
    Nanosats and Smallsats
    National Security Space
    Robotic Technology and Space Architecture
    Space and Earth Science
    Space Colonization and Space Tethers
    Space Exploration
    Space History, Society, and Policy
    Space Logistics and Supportability
    Space Operations
    Space Resources
    Space Systems and Sensors
    Space Systems Engineering and Space Economics
    Space Transportation and Launch Systems

     

    Questions pertaining to the technical program may be referred to the SPACE 2013 Technical Program Chairs Randy Kendall at randolph.l.kendall@aero.org and John Chobany at john.chobany@aero.org, or to the appropriate Track Chair listed below.

    Abstract Requirements

    While there is no required abstract length, 200-500 words is recommended.

    Proposals for Special Sessions

    Individuals who wish to organize special sessions within the technical program (e.g., invited oral presentations, panels, or demonstrations) should submit a short proposal describing the nature of the session as it relates to a specified technical track. Be sure to include the names of the organizers and proposed participants. Please email your proposal by 17 January 2013 to Randy Kendall, SPACE 2013 Technical Program Co-Chair, at randolph.l.kendall@aero.org.  

    Technical Topics  

    Commercial Space  

    Supported by the AIAA Commercial Space Group

     

    The established community of commercial space companies tracing their lineage to the mid-1960s is being joined by an emerging new group of entrepreneurs. These “New Space” companies have characteristics very different from their predecessors, and creative partnerships between the old and the new are developing. The Commercial Space track is soliciting papers that document the various aspects of emerging commercial space sectors and their collaboration with the established commercial space community. Discussions of New Space successes and challenges encompass a large number of topic areas, including: 

    • Suborbital and orbital transportation andt ourism
    • Orbital commercial facilities, propellant depots, and infrastructure
    • Orbital transfer vehicles
    • Microgravity commerce and research
    • Commercial lunar and NEO
    • National space policy
    • Legal and regulatory
    • International markets and cooperation
    • Business and financing
    • Aerospace technology transfer to other industries

     

    For questions, please contact:

     

    Lisa Matthews

    Sierra Nevada Corp.

    lisa.matthews@sncorp.com 

     

    BrucePittman

    NASA Space Portal/Ames Research Center

    robert.b.pittman@nasa.gov

     

    Intelligent Systems

    Supported by the AIAA Intelligent Systems Technical Committee (ISTC)  

     

    Papers are sought on applications of intelligent systems across the space domain to include spacecraft operations, spacecraft autonomy, space system monitoring, and adaptive response. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

     

    • Autonomous payloads
    • Autonomous telemetry monitoring systems
    • Data fusion and reasoning
    • Decision support systems
    • Human-machine interaction
    • Integrated System Health Management and Intelligent Fault Management systems
    • Intelligent and adaptive control
    • Intelligent data/image processing
    • Knowledge-based systems and knowledge engineering
    • Machine learning
    • Planning and scheduling algorithms
    • Robust execution and sequencing systems

     

    For questions, please contact:

     

    Paul Zetocha

    AIAA Intelligent Systems Technical Committee(ISTC)

    Air Force Research Laboratory

    paul.zetocha@kirtland.af.mil

      

    ChristopherR. Tschan

    AIAA Intelligent Systems Technical Committee (ISTC)

    The Aerospace Corporation

    christopher.r.tschan@aero.org

     

     

    Nanosats and Smallsats

    Supported by the AIAA Space Systems Technical Committee (SSTC)

    The Nanosats and Smallsats track seeks to present important findings from recent work on emerging design, development, implementation, and applications of satellites with wet mass between 1-10kg, typically defined as "nanosats,” or less than 500kg, typically defined as "smallsats." Papers are sought on technical, operational, and economic feasibility of systems that address the full range of civil scientific, military, and international applications. Papers by students are especially encouraged. Technical topics include:

    • Nanosat (Smallsat) architectures and concepts of operation
    • New and emerging technologies and applications
    • Rapid and responsive Nanosat (Smallsat) systems
    • Enabling technologies for distributed or fractionated space
    • Space sensor technologies for Nanosats (Smallsats)
    • Workforce development for Nanosats (Smallsats)
    • Nanosat (Smallsat) lessons learned


    For questions, please contact:

    Amy Lo
    AIAA Space Systems Technical Committee (SSTC)
    Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems
    amy.lo@ngc.com

    National Security Space


    The National Security Space track invites papers in the following areas: 

    • Advanced Concepts: Including advanced CONOPS, material solutions, and architectural solutions
    • Technology Transition: Including updates on existing programs working on technology transition from any partner toward the NSS customer
    • Enterprise Architecting Analysis: Including requirements analysis, military utility analysis, multi-mission analysis and one-on-one engagement analysis, acquisition simulation analysis, and procurement
    • Emerging Trends: Including descriptions of the latest trends affecting the MIL space applications and development
    • Prototypes and Demonstrations: Including updates on existing prototypes in the NSS pipeline
    • Science and Technology Efforts: Including those aimed at key science and technologies for revolutionary MIL applications

    Robotic Technologies and Space Architecture

    Supported by the AIAA Space Architecture Technical Committee and the AIAA Space Automation and Robotics Technical Committee

    This track will explore robotic technologies for orbital and planetary surface applications and space architectures, including systems supporting robotic construction techniques. Abstracts are being solicited on the following technical topics:

    • Advanced Technologies for Space Robotics
    • Unique Applications of Space Robotics
    • Self-Sustaining/Self-Repairing Systems
    • Robotic EVA or IVA Servicing
    • Robot and Spacecraft Automation
    • Crew Cabin Architecture
    • Orbital and Planetary Surface Construction
    • Unique Space Architecture Design 


    For questions, please contact:

    Steven E. Fredrickson
    AIAA Space Automation and Robotics Technical Committee (SARTC)
    NASA Johnson Space Center
    steven.fredrickson@nasa.gov

    Shahzad Khaligh
    AIAA Space Architecture Technical Committee (SATC)
    DOD-AF-ENI
    Shahzad.khaligh@cox.net

    François Lévy
    AIAA Space Architecture Technical Committee (SATC)
    Synthesis International
    francoislevy@synthesis-intl.com

    Gregory P. Scott
    AIAA Space Automation and Robotics Technical Committee (SARTC)
    U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
    gregory.scott@nrl.navy.mil

    Space and Earth Science

    Supported by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Sessions for the Space and Earth Science track are by invitation only. If interested in participating, please contact:

    Virendra Sarohia
    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    virendra.sarohia@jpl.nasa.gov

    Space Colonization and Space Tethers

    Supported by the AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee and the AIAA Space Tethers Technical Committee

    The goal of space colonization is to create permanent human settlements beyond Earth. A logical implementation approach to would be to develop outposts and colonies in key locations in space (e.g., Lagrange points) and on the moon, near-Earth asteroids, and Mars, as technological advances enable progressively more ambitious missions. The Apollo missions demonstrated that humans can land on and explore other bodies in our solar system. The Shuttle and ISS missions demonstrate that humans can live and work in LEO for extended periods of time. Humanity is ready for exciting and challenging exploration missions beyond LEO that will open the door for future expansion into the solar system. The development of advanced science and technologies needed for space settlements will help humanity improve life on Earth and shape a better future. Space tethers show great promise for enabling a variety of future space missions, both as engineering components and as scientific components. Applications of space tethers include propulsion, space structures, remote sensing, and artificial gravity, among others. To date, several tethered missions have flown and many more have been proposed for flight. This track will include missions enabled and the technologies necessary for exploiting the use of space tethers.

    Papers are invited that address the following topics related to space colonization:

    • Drivers: Desires for exploration, commerce, tourism, and adventure
    • Destinations: Space, the moon, asteroids, and Mars, including missions
    • Challenges: Environment, distance, isolation, logistics, and financing
    • Designs: Concepts for robotic and human vehicles, outposts, and colonies
    • Exploitation: Mining, utilization of in-situ resources, and terraforming
    • Enablers: Needed research and development of key technologies
    • Space law: Claims, property rights, extraction of resources, and commerce


    Papers are invited that address the following topics related to space tethers:

    • Theory: Physics, kinematics, dynamics, and material requirements
    • Applications: Advantages gained by using space tethers
    • Missions: Unique missions enabled by space tethers
    • Enablers: Needed research and development of key technologies


    For questions, please contact:

    Sven G. Bilén
    AIAA Space Tethers Technical Committee (STETC)
    The Pennsylvania State University
    sbilen@engr.psu.edu

    Anita Gale
    AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee (SCTC)
    The Boeing Company
    anita.e.gale@boeing.com


    Space Exploration

    Supported by NASA Headquarters and the AIAA Space Exploration Program Committee

    The Space Exploration track spans mission architectures, advanced technologies, and flight systems to enable robotic precursor and human exploration missions to the moon, Lagrange points, Near Earth Objects (NEOs), and Mars and its moons. Abstracts are being solicited on the following topics:

    • Mission Architectures: Studies, systems analysis, and operational scenarios for human exploration missions beyond Earth orbit 
    • Enabling Technologies: The development of critical technologies to enable human exploration missions, including advanced propulsion; cryogenic propellant storage and transfer; high-efficiency space power systems; life support and habitation systems; radiation shielding; entry, descent, and landing technology; EVA technology; advanced robotics; autonomous systems and avionics; high-data-rate communications; in-situ resource utilization; and lightweight structures and materials 
    • Robotic Precursor Missions: Mission concepts and plans for robotic precursor missions to characterize space environments and scout potential destinations for future human activity 
    • Flight Systems: Flight experiments to demonstrate critical capabilities, and development of crew exploration vehicles and in-space transportation systems 
    • Using ISS for Exploration: Using ISS as an analog for long-duration missions, and as a test bed for demonstrating technologies and operational concepts for exploration.


    For questions, please contact:

    Chris Moore
    AIAA Space Exploration Program Committee
    NASA Headquarters
    christopher.moore@nasa.gov

    Surendra P. Sharma
    AIAA Space Exploration Program Committee
    NASA Ames Research Center
    Surendra.P.Sharma@nasa.gov


    Space History, Society, and Policy

    Supported by the AIAA International Activities Committee, the AIAA History Technical Committee, the AIAA Legal Aspects of Aeronautics and Astronautics Technical Committee, and the AIAA Society and Aerospace Technology Technical Committee

    The Space History, Society, and Policy Track examines the history of our time in space, space law and policy, international cooperation, the societal impacts of aerospace technologies and an educated and trained workforce, and the evolution of our space-faring society. Topics addressed include:

    • The History of Aerospace – Legacy and Lessons Learned: Collection, preservation, and analysis of historical materials related to spaceflight and space technology, manned space programs, launch systems, unmanned programs – with an emphasis on understanding the significance of people and organizations, programs, facilities, and infrastructure
    • Space Law and Policy: Current and emerging policy and legal issues affecting space acquisition, operations, sustainment, and the future of space activities; national space policies of the United States, other countries, and the United Nations; the U.S. National Space Strategy; liabilities and legal obligations associated with space debris and end-of-life and orbital operations; space warfare; insurance, contracting, and liability issues; jamming threats and telecommunications regulation, and legal institutions
    • International Cooperation: Risks and opportunities of cooperative engagement; recognizing and surmounting legal impediments to cooperation, including ITAR and technology transfer control regimes; successful and unsuccessful international approaches to acquiring, organizing, operating, and sustaining space systems; international institutions
    • Space Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) perspectives: Shortfalls in the space workforce's STEM education and training, and their impact; and policy, programmatic and economic solutions to education and workforce shortfalls
    • Spinoffs and Technology Transfer: Space technologies and discoveries transferred or commercialized outside of the industry; policies enabling technology transfer and technology transfer lessons learned; analyses of the societal impacts of space technology spinoffs
    • Interactions with Society: Impact of space systems on communication, trade, and access to information; the impact of space systems and technology on global emergency response to disasters or acts of terrorism; space stakeholder risk tolerance and perceptions; analyses of the intangible benefits of spaceflight and of space themes in media and literature
    • Astrosociology: Social, cultural, psychological, ethical dimensions, and the institutional responses associated with space medicine and isolated long-duration space missions; psychological, sociological, and anthropological perspectives on space-based natural disasters


    In addition, this track will host a Best Student Paper Competition. Submitted and accepted papers by student authors will be presented within a session of the Space History, Society, and Policy track. Papers will be judged based on merit with the winning paper(s) receiving a certificate and a monetary award. For further information, including the complete rules and guidelines of the competition, please visit the SATTC Web site at https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/SATTC/, or contact the competition administrator, Brad Steinfeldt, at bsteinfeldt@gatech.edu.

    For questions, please contact:

    Soumyo Dutta
    AIAA Society and Aerospace Technology Technical Committee (SATTC)
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    soumyo.dutta@gatech.edu

    Cam Martin
    AIAA History Technical Committee (HISTC)
    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center
    cam.martin-1@nasa.gov

    James D. Rendleman
    AIAA Legal Aspects of Aeronautics and Astronautics Technical Committee (LAAATC)
    AIAA International Activities Committee (IAC)
    Rendleman & Associates
    napatarheel@hotmail.com

    Space Logistics and Supportability

    Supported by the AIAA Space Logistics Technical Committee

    Space logistics is the theory and practice of driving space system design for operability, and of managing the flow of materiel, services, and information needed throughout a space system lifecycle. It includes management of the logistics supply chain from Earth and on to destinations throughout the solar system. Supportability considers system architecture strategies to minimize both logistics requirements and operational costs of human and robotic operations. Supportability strategies include processes and technologies to minimize maintenance complexity, exploit in-situ resources, scavenge and reuse flight hardware, and recycle consumables. Representative areas include the servicing and sustainment of the International Space Station and of lunar and planetary outposts, the optimization of logistics launch vehicles for responsiveness and serviceability, and modeling of the supply chain in space for human and robotic mission campaigns. Technical topics include: 

    • International Space Station on-orbit resources management
    • In-space spacecraft and satellite servicing
    • Advanced Supportability Concepts: in-situ repair, in-situ fabrication, flight hardware scavenging and reuse, resource pre-positioning, consumables recycling 
    • Advanced Destination Logistics: outpost management and provisioning, in-situ resource logistics, EVA logistics
    • Advanced Space Logistics Infrastructures: solar power stations, on-orbit fuel depots, refueling in space, planetary or asteroid resource infrastructures
    • Logistics of NASA, DoD, and Commercial Programs: space operations affordability, design for commonality, integrated logistics concepts
    • Space Logistics Campaign Planning: methods, modeling, simulation, and cost analysis tools 
    • Automated spaceflight supply chain asset tracking and monitoring
    • Spaceport ground processing and launch logistics
    • Commercial space logistics opportunities


    For questions, please contact:

    Kandyce E. Goodliff
    AIAA Space Logistics Technical Committee (SLTC)
    NASA Langley Research Center
    kandyce.e.goodliff@nasa.gov

    Richard Oeftering
    AIAA Space Logistics Technical Committee (SLTC)
    NASA Glenn Research Center
    richard.c.oeftering@nasa.gov

    Space Operations

    Supported by the AIAA Space Operations and Support Technical Committee

    This track is calling for papers in a number of areas that are key to the success of spacecraft and launch systems, with an emphasis on the operational aspect. Technical topics include:

    • Space operations in the 21st century
    • Space operations automation and reducing cost of operations
    • Future human and robotics space exploration operations
    • Mission operations assurance
    • Responsive space operations
    • Human factors in space operations
    • Advanced technologies for space operations
    • Network-centric space operations
    • Space operations policy
    • Improving space operations
    • Spaceport operations
    • Future satellite operations


    For questions, please contact:

    Shirley Tseng
    AIAA Space Operations and Support Technical Committee (SOSTC)
    MorganFranklin Corporation
    shirleytseng@earthlink.net

    Space Resources

    Supported by the AIAA Space Resources Technical Committee

    Utilization of the natural resources found in space offers a uniquely sustainable approach to space exploration. By leveraging available materials on planetary bodies, the constraining supply chain can be broken. The Space Resources Track will examine alternatives to the classic resupply challenge by providing many of the needed commodities for human and robotic sustainment using locally available resources. The current focus on multiple exploration destinations has renewed interest in the resources of Mars and near-Earth objects. Papers are solicited on all aspects of the resource utilization cycle, from prospecting and precursor missions through production, storage, and delivery. Technical topics include:

    • Resource Prospecting and Precursor Missions
    • Resource Collection and Transport
    • Lunar Resource Utilization Technologies
    • Asteroid Resource Utilization Technologies
    • Mars Resource Utilization Technologies
    • ISRU for Fabrication and Repair
    • ISRU Hardware Demonstrations and Case Studies


    For questions, please contact:

    Larry Clark

     


    Leslie Gertsch
    AIAA Space Resources Technical Committee (SRETC)
    Missouri University of Science and Technology
    gertschl@mst.edu

    Space Systems and Sensors

    Supported by the AIAA Space Systems Technical Committee

    The Space Systems and Sensors track seeks to present important findings from recent work on emerging space systems, space science, and sensor technologies. In particular, papers are sought that address technical, operational, and economic feasibility of current and future space systems that address the full range of civil, military, and international applications. Papers by students are especially encouraged. Technical topics include:

    • Architectures and Concepts of Operation
    • New and Emerging Technologies and Applications
    • Remote Sensing for Climate and Weather
    • Space and Planetary Science Missions and Technologies
    • Rapid and Responsive Space Systems
    • Enabling Technologies for Distributed or Fractionated Space
    • Proximity Sensing of Space Objects and Orbital Space Situational Awareness (SSA)
    • Space Sensor Technologies
    • Laser Communication
    • Cubesats
    • Workforce Development for Space Systems and Sensors Engineering (Panel)
    • Space Systems Lessons Learned (Panel)


    For questions, please contact:

    Amy Lo
    AIAA Space Systems Technical Committee (SSTC)
    Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems
    amy.lo@ngc.com

    Jim Baker
    AIAA Space Systems Technical Committee (SSTC)
    MEI Technologies
    james.baker@meitechinc.com

    Space Systems Engineering and Space Economics

    Supported by the AIAA Economics Technical Committee and the AIAA Systems Engineering Technical Committee

    The role of systems engineering in space programs has become more important as systems have become increasingly complex, architectures have become expansive, and integration across architectures has become commonplace and essential. As the utilization of space increases, driven by technological advances and mission need, the cost and economics of space will remain a formidable challenge. These challenges can be met by analyzing data and developing models to clarify the best value and key economic insights for decision makers. A goal of the systems engineering and space economics community is to develop and apply capabilities to facilitate robust future space systems. Aspects of systems engineering and space economics that may be included in this track are:

    • Definition and application of space system architectures
    • Advances in systems engineering processes and tools applied to space systems
    • Systems engineering lessons learned from current and previous space programs 
    • Space systems requirements generation, verification, and validation
    • Space systems integration and associated tests 
    • Systems engineering for autonomous space systems 
    • Space systems risk management 
    • Evaluating and balancing space systems cost, performance, schedule, and risk 
    • Space workforce development and industrial base challenges
    • New developments in economic analysis and cost models
    • Examples of trade studies incorporating economic analysis, affordability, or value engineering
    • Space systems engineering efficiencies in a constrained budget environment


    For questions, please contact:

    Michelle Bailey 
    AIAA Systems Engineering Technical Committee (SETC)

    mic.bailey@att.net

    Jairus M. Hihn
    AIAA Economics Technical Committee (ECOTC)
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    jairus.m.hihn@jpl.nasa.gov

    Space Transportation and Launch Systems

    Supported by the AIAA Reusable Launch Vehicle Program Committee and the AIAA Space Transportation Technical Committee

    The success of all space endeavors—military, scientific, exploration, and commercial—depends upon low-cost, highly reliable access to space. Since the retirement of the Space Shuttle, current worldwide space deployments are achieved through expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). New emerging space companies have offered the promise of low-cost space access, and some of them are proceeding with development and testing efforts. NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services Demonstration Program is designed to demonstrate low-cost, reliable commercial cargo delivery, and potentially crew delivery, to the International Space Station (ISS). NASA has contracted for ISS Commercial Resupply Services for resupply and return of ISS cargo. NASA’s human exploration program promises to continue the U.S. civilian human spaceflight effort by developing and operating new vehicle systems for human exploration of the solar system. Within the U.S. DoD, reusable launch vehicle (RLV) activity is gaining momentum with the Air Force's technology development activities for a reusable first stage. Papers are invited that address the issues and challenges associated with space transportation. Papers may be submitted within, but are not limited to, the following categories:

    • Space transportation system, technology, design, and integration challenges 
    • In-space transportation systems and architectures, including propellant depots 
    • Advanced concept vehicles and systems 
    • Launch vehicles
    • Designs, concepts, and developments (ELVs , RLVs, or partially reusable LVs) 
    • RLV development, programmatic (including economics), and industry-related strategies 
    • Lessons learned from previous RLV-related programs and design studies 
    • Operationally responsive space 
    • Operations of spaceports and ranges 
    • Space transportation for space tourism 
    • Space transportation analytical tools, materials, and technologies 
    • Suborbital vehicles and systems


    For questions, please contact:

    Adam Dissel
    AIAA Reusable Launch Vehicle Program Committee (RLVPC)
    Lockheed Martin Space Systems
    adam.f.dissel@lmco.com

    Barry Hellman
    AIAA Reusable Launch Vehicle Program Committee (RLVPC)
    Air Force Research Laboratory
    barry.hellman@wpafb.af.mil

    Miroslav Sir
    AIAA Space Transportation Technical Committee (STTC)
    The Aerospace Corporation
    miro.sir@aero.org