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The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)

is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    CONTACT: DUANE HYLAND
    703.264.7558
    duaneh@aiaa.org

     

     

    AIAA ANNOUNCES SECTION AWARD WINNERS
    Awards Honor Outstanding Section Programming in a Variety of Categories

    September 24, 2012 – Reston, Va. – The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) has announced its 2011–2012 Section Award winners. The Section Awards annually honor particularly notable achievements made by member sections in a range of activities that help fulfill the Institute’s mission. The Institute believes that vital, active sections are essential to its success.

    Section awards are made annually in five categories based on size of membership. Each winning section receives a certificate and a cash award – $500 for first place, $200 for second, and $100 for third. The award period covered is June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2012. The judges noted that their job was especially challenging this year given the wide range of outstanding and unique section events to evaluate.

    Sections winning first-place awards will be honored at an AIAA awards luncheon on January 8, 2013, as part of the 51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, which will be held January 7–10, 2013 at the Gaylord Texan Hotel and Convention Center, Grapevine, Texas (in the Dallas–Fort Worth area).

    The Outstanding Section Award is presented to sections based upon their overall activities and contributions through the year. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair; Second Place: Delaware, Eric Spero, section chair; Third Place: Adelaide, Ian Tuohy, section chair; Honorable Mention: Greater New Orleans, Mounir Sabbagh, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Michael Wolff, section chair; Second Place (tie): Columbus,, Jolanta Janiszewska, acting section chair; Second Place (tie): Utah, John Armstrong, section chair; Honorable Mention: Vandenberg, Thomas Stevens, section chair.

    Medium: First Place: Michigan, John Sordyl, section chair; Second Place: Tucson, , Kirk Hively, section chair; Third Place (tie): Twin Cities, Kristen Gerzina, section chair; Third Place (tie): Long Island, David Paris, section chair
      Large: First Place: Phoenix, M. Brett McMickell, section chair; Second Place: Northern Ohio, George Williams, section chair; Third Place: Cape Canaveral, Susie Allen-Sierpinski, section chair; Honorable Mention: St. Louis, Brad Sexton, section chair; Honorable Mention: Albuquerque, Donald Nash, section chair.

    Very Large: First Place (tie): Dayton/Cincinnati, Marc Polanka, section chair; First Place (tie): Hampton Roads, Melissa Carter, section chair; Honorable Mention: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Richard Van Allen, section chair; Honorable Mention: Greater Huntsville, Emmett McDonald, section chair; Honorable Mention: Mid Atlantic, Andrea Kodys, section chair.

    The Career and Workforce Development Award is presented for section activities that focus on career development, such as time management workshops, career transition workshops, job benefits workshops, and technical versus management career path workshops. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place (tie): Delaware, Timothy McCardell, career and workforce development officer; First Place (tie): Sydney, Michael West, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Michael Wolff, section chair.

    Medium: First Place: Twin Cities, Christopher Sanden, vice chair; Second Place: Tucson, Kirk Hively, section chair; Third Place: Michigan, Tori Buckley, career and workforce development officer.

     

    Large: First Place: Phoenix, Dennis Barbeau, career and workforce development officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Jamie Johnson, career and workforce development officer; Second Place: Greater Huntsville, Sheree Gay, career and workforce development officer; Third Place: Hampton Roads, Richard Winski, career and workforce development officer.

     

    The Communication Award is presented to sections that have developed and implemented an outstanding communications outreach program. Winning criteria include level of complexity, timeliness, and variety of methods of communications, as well as frequency, format, and content of the communications outreach. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place (tie): Sydney, Michael West, section chair; First Place (tie): Delaware, M. David Rosenberg, newsletter editor.

    Small: First Place: Columbus, Tom Ramsay, membership officer; Second Place: Savannah, Johanna Bussell, secretary.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Mike Wethington, website editor; Second Place: Long Island, David Paris, newsletter editor; Third Place: Twin Cities, Brian Gulliver, webmaster; Honorable Mention: Michigan, John Sordyl, section chair.
      Large: First Place: Cape Canaveral, Jennifer Holland, communications officer and newsletter editor; Second Place: Albuquerque, Michael Ross, newsletter editor; Third Place (tie): St. Louis, Dave Morgan, communications officer; Third Place (tie): Phoenix, Michael Mackowski, website editor; Honorable Mention: Northern Ohio, Peggy Cornell, secretary and communications officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Rocky Mountain, Sean Keefe, newsletter editor; Second Place: Hampton Roads, John Lin, newsletter editor; Third Place: Dayton/ Cincinnati, Michael List, communications officer; Honorable Mention: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Lisa Kaspin, website editor.


    The Membership Award is presented to sections that have increased their membership by planning and implementing effective recruitment and retention campaigns. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place: Delaware, M. David Rosenberg, membership officer; Second Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Kelly Rombold, membership officer; Second Place: Columbus, Tom Ramsay, membership officer.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Jeffrey Jepson, membership officer; Second Place: Michigan, John Sordyl, section chair; Third Place: Twin Cities, Andrew Carlson, membership officer.
      Large: First Place: Phoenix, Ryan Carlblom, membership officer; Second Place: St. Louis, Darin Haudrich, membership chair; Third Place: San Fernando Pacific, Carl Ehrlich, membership officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Oliver Leembruggen, membership officer; Second Place: Hampton Roads,Marlyn Andino , section officer; Third Place: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Richard Van Allen, section chair.


    The Harry Staubs Precollege Outreach Award is presented to sections that have developed and implemented an outstanding STEM K–12 outreach program that provides quality educational resources for K–12 teachers in the “STEM” subject areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place: Wisconsin, Michael Fidler, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Delaware, Breanne Wooten, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Francois Hugon, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Columbus, Tom Ramsey, Membership officer.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Catherine McKay, STEM K–12 outreach officer and Mike Wethington, website editor; Second Place: Southwest Texas, Joan Labay-Marquez, education and STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place: Michigan, Jamey Condevaux, STEM K–12 outreach officer.

      Large: First Place: Greater Philadelphia, Karl Fetzer, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Phoenix, Tracey Dodrill, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place: Cape Canaveral, David Fleming, honors and awards officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Carl Tilmann, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Hampton Roads, Karen Berger and Shann Rufer, education and STEM K–12 outreach officers; Third Place: Mid Atlantic, Tom Milnes, STEM K–12 outreach officer.


    The Public Policy Award is presented for stimulating public awareness of the needs and benefits of aerospace research and development, particularly on the part of government representatives, and for educating section members about the value of public policy activities. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place (tie): Delaware, Timothy Dominick, public policy officer; First Place (tie): Sydney, Michael West, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Shawn Herrmann, treasurer and Wallace Isom, public policy officer; Second Place: Columbus, Tom Ramsay, membership officer.

    Medium: First Place: Long Island, Frank Hayes, public policy officer; Second Place: Central Florida, Amanda DePreta, public policy officer; Third Place (tie): Tucson, Matt Angiulo, public policy officer; Third Place (tie): Michigan, Jan Rigterink, public policy officer.
      Large: First Place: Phoenix, Richard Christiansen, section chair; Second Place: Northern Ohio, James Gilland, public policy officer; Third Place: Cape Canaveral, Kevin Simmons, public policy officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, Lee Rich and Lina Little, public policy officers; Second Place (tie): Dayton/Cincinnati, Troy Welker, public policy officer; Second Place (tie): Greater Huntsville, Thomas Hancock, public policy officer; Honorable Mention: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Seth Potter and Colin McCaughey, public policy officers.


    The Young Professional Activity Award is presented for excellence in planning and executing events that encourage the participation of the Institute’s young professional members, and provide opportunities for leadership at the section, regional, or national level. The winners are:


    Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Jeremiah Shiflet, young professional activities officer; Second Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair; Third Place: Adelaide, Matthew Tetlow, vice chair and young professional activities officer.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Antonio Hsieh and Anne Carobine, young professional activities officers.

    Medium: First Place: Twin Cities, Weston Kirch, young professional activities officer; Second Place: Michigan, Andy Mazurkiewicz, young professional activities officer; Third Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, vice chair.
      Large: Honorable Mention: Phoenix, Lindsay Harding, Jake Downey and Ryan Carlblom, young professional activities officers; Honorable Mention: Greater Philadelphia, Abebe Peters, young professional activities officer; Honorable Mention: Cape Canaveral, Luke Roberson, young professional activities officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Robert Mitchell, young professional activities officer; Second Place: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Eric Gever, young professional activities officer; Third Place: Hampton Roads, Jeremy Pinier, young professional activities officer.


    The Outstanding Activity Award allows the Institute to acknowledge sections that held an outstanding activity deserving of additional recognition. The winners are:


    Very Small: Sydney, Michael West, section chair. Young Professionals Aerospace Field Trip Around Canberra. This two-day field trip provided young professional and student members from Sydney an opportunity to visit several aerospace facilities and laboratories in Canberra and to network and interact for the first time with young professional and professional members located in Canberra.

    Small: Savannah, Michael Wolff, section chair. Girl Scouts Engineer It Day. The event was planned to reach out to local Girl Scout troops to get them excited about STEM career paths. There were multiple stations that were tailored to age that had demonstrations and learning activities put on by co-sponsoring organizations. AIAA had two stations set up; one was the wind tunnel demonstration. The other was a flight simulator real world design problem. This was the first step in allowing the section access to this group of girls and hopefully expose them to how cool engineering is. In the future they hope to get more involved in the Girl Scouts to promote STEM as a career path and passion.

    Medium: Central Florida, Randal Allen, section chair. Wings ’n’ Things. This was a STEM K–12 event held at the Florida Air Museum at Sun ’n’ Fun in Leesburg, FL, in which Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts (and their sisters) built and flew model rockets. Approximately 500 youth took part in this full-day event. In the morning session, they built their model rockets. After lunch, they launched their rockets, some multiple times – until they ran out of engines. A few Section members and several AIAA/UCF students participated in this full-day activity.

     

    Large: Northern Ohio, George Williams, section chair. Young Astronauts Day. Young Astronauts Day remains the premier STEM outreach event to K–12 students in Region III. While 350 or so students actually participate in the event, preparation for and follow-on discussions in the schools are estimated to engage several thousand students. Evidence of the impact of this event on local schools is the significant increase in aerospace related science projects by elementary students and in the increasing number of requests of aerospace professionals to address classes in the schools.

    Very Large (tie)Hampton Roads, Melissa Carter, section chair. NASA Langley Day of Education. Hampton Roads Section and NASA Langley Research Center teamed up to plan and run the 2nd Annual NASA Langley Day of Education. Fifty-six HRS members volunteered by going into classrooms of numerous K–12 schools in the Hampton Roads area and talking to students about STEM subjects and helping out with the teaching materials. This year’s event was able to reach 19,000 pre-K through 12th grade students and over 900 teachers.

    Very Large (tie): Greater Huntsville, Emmett McDonald, section chair. Kick-Off for Formation of Alabama A&M University AIAA Student Branch. The event was a luncheon held at Alabama A&M University to provide a forum for kicking off the formation of their AIAA Student Branch. The keynote address, provided by Leland Melvin, was inspirational to all in attendance as he shared his stories of space flight, personal accomplishments, and triumph over adversity. The event also included a tour of the Engineering Laboratories at AAMU, highlighted with a demonstration of the newly completed supersonic wind tunnel.

     

    AIAA is the world’s largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession. With more than 35,000 individual members worldwide, and nearly 100 corporate members, AIAA brings together industry, academia, and government to advance engineering and science in aviation, space, and defense. For more information, visit www.aiaa.org.


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    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Suite 500, Reston, VA 20191-4344
    Phone: 703.264.7558 Fax: 703.264.7551 www.aiaa.org