AIAA

The World's Forum for Aerospace Leadership

  • MY AIAA
  • Donate
  • Press Room
  • Renew
  • View Cart
The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)

is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession.

    • ARC
    • AIAA Foundation
    • Industry Guide

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    CONTACT: DUANE HYLAND
    703.264.7558
    duaneh@aiaa.org

     

    AIAA ANNOUNCES SECTION AWARD WINNERS
    Awards Honor Outstanding Section Programming in a Variety of Categories

    September 23, 2013 – Reston, Va. – The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) has announced its 2012–2013 Section Award winners. The Section Awards annually honor particularly notable achievements made by member sections in a range of activities that help fulfill the Institute’s mission. The Institute believes that vital, active sections are essential to its success.

    Section awards are made annually in five categories based on size of membership. Each winning section receives a certificate and a cash award – $500 for first place, $200 for second, and $100 for third. The award period covered is June 1, 2012 through May 31, 2013.

    The Outstanding Section Award is presented to sections based upon their overall activities and contributions through the year. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair; Second Place: Delaware, Eric Spero, section chair; Third Place: China Lake,Ying-Ming Lee, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Terry Richter, section chair; Second Place: Twin Cities,Kristen Gerzina, section chair; Third Place: Utah, Jeffrey Boulware, section chair.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Kirk Hively, section chair; Second Place: Cape Canaveral, Tristan Clouse, section chair; Third Place: Long Island, David Paris, section chair.
      Large: First Place (tie): Northern Ohio, Kevin Melcher, section chair; Atlanta, Cameron Miller, section chair; Second Place: Phoenix, Rob Trepa, section chair.

    Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, Courtney Spells Winski, section chair; Second Place (tie): Los Angeles-Las Vegas, Jeffery Pushcell, section chair; Greater Huntsville, Tom Kmiec, section chair; Third Place (tie): Pacific Northwest, Kimberly Hicks,section chair; Dayton-Cincinanati Oliver Leembruggen, section chair.

     

    The Career and Workforce Development Award is presented for section activities that focus on career development, such as time management workshops, career transition workshops, job benefits workshops, and technical versus management career path workshops. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Michael Spencer, career and workforce development officer.

    Small: Honorable Mention: Savannah, Bethany Love and Brian Farmer, career and workforce development officers.

     

    Very Large: First Place: San Francisco, Steven Cerri, career and workforce development officer.

     

    The Communication Award is presented to sections that have developed and implemented an outstanding communications outreach program. Winning criteria include level of complexity, timeliness, and variety of methods of communications, as well as frequency, format, and content of the communications outreach. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place (tie): Sydney, Michael West, section chair; First Place (tie): Delaware, M. David Rosenberg, newsletter editor, Honorable Mention:China Lake, Jeffrey Scott, communications officer and treasurer

    Small: First Place: Utah, Jeffrey Boulware, chair and Spencer Brown, communications officer and treasurer.Second Place: Savannah, Johanna Bussell, secretary; Third Place: Twin Cities, Brian Gulliver, webmaster.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Mike Wethington, webmaster and STEM K-12 officer; Second Place: Long Island, David Paris, chair and newsletter editor; Third Place: Cape Canaveral, Jennifer Holland, newsletter editor and communications officer.
      Large: First Place: Northern Ohio, Edmond Wong, communications officer; Second Place: Atlanta , Cameron Miller, section chair; Third Place: San Diego, Rick Kwan, communications officer.

    Very Large: First Place:Hampton Roads, John Lin, newsletter editor; Second Place: Greater Huntsville, Thomas Kmiec, chair; Third Place: Houston, Daniel Nobels, section chair; Honorable Mention: San Francisco, Rick Kwan, communications officer.

     

    The Membership Awardis presented to sections that have increased their membership by planning and implementing effective recruitment and retention campaigns. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Amelia Greig, membership officer; Second Place: Delaware, M. David Rosenberg section chair, Third Place: China Lake, Jeff Scott, membership officer.

    Small: First Place: Utah, Jeffrey Boulware, section chair and Charlie Vono, membership officer; Second Place: Savannah, Kelly Rombold, membership chair; Third Place, Twin Cities, Weston Kirch, membership officer.

    Medium: First Place: Cape Canaveral, Susie Allen-Sierpinksi, membership officer; Second Place: Central Florida, Aaron Blevins, vice chair and membership chair; Third Place: Tucson, Kirk Hively, membership officer.
      Large: First Place: St. Louis, Frank Youkhana, section chair; Second Place: Phoenix, Ryan Carlblom, membership chair; Third Place (tie): San Fernando Pacific, Carl Ehrlich, membership officer; Third Place (tie): Orange County H. R. Welge, membership officer

    Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, Marlyn Andino, membership officer; Second Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Oliver Leembruggen , membership officer.

     

    The Harry Staubs Precollege Outreach Award is presented to sections that have developed and implemented an outstanding STEM K–12 outreach program that provides quality educational resources for K–12 teachers in the “STEM” subject areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place: Wisconsin, Todd Treichel, section chair and acting STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Delaware, Breanne Wooten, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place:China Lake, Randy Drobny, vice chair.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Francois Hugon and Chris Willias, STEM K–12 outreach officers; Second Place: Northwest Florida, Tucker Hamilton, STEM K-12 outreach officer; Third Place: Twin Cites, Christopher Sanden, vice chair.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Mike Wethington and Tia Burley, STEM K–12 outreach officers; Second Place: Central Florida,Morgan Ewen, education and STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place:Southwest Texas, Joan Labay-Marquez, secretary, STEM K–12 outreach officer.
      Large: First Place: Phoenix, Mike Mackowski, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Orange County, Janet Koepke, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place: Northern Ohio, Grant Henson, STEM K-12 outreach officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Carl Tilmann, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place(tie): Hampton Roads, Karen Berger and Shann Rufer, education and STEM K–12 outreach officers; Second Place(tie): Mid Atlantic, Tom Milnes, STEM K–12 outreach officer.

     

    The Public Policy Award is presented for stimulating public awareness of the needs and benefits of aerospace research and development, particularly on the part of government representatives, and for educating section members about the value of public policy activities. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Timothy Dominick, public policy officer; Second Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair.

    Small: First Place: Utah, Jeffrey Boulware, section chair and Ron Thue, public policy officer;Second Place: Twin Cities, Lindsay Wagner, public policy officer; Third Place: Savannah,Michel Wolff, public policy officer.

    Medium: First Place: Long Island, Frank Hayes, public policy officer; Second Place: Cape Canaveral, Kevin Simmons, public policy officer; Third Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, vice chair, and Jeff Jepson, membership officer
      Large: First Place (tie): Phoenix, Tracey Lou Dodrill, public policy officer; First Place (tie): Atlanta, Ben Walker, public policy officer; Honorable Mention: Northern Ohio, Amber Abbott, public policy officer; Honorable Mention: Orange County, Kamal Shweyk, public policy officer.

    Very Large: First Place (tie): Greater Huntsville, Tom Hancock, public policy officers; First Place (tie): Rocky Mountain, Pamela Burke, public policy officer; Honorable Mention: Hampton Roads, Lena Little, public policy officer.

     

    The Young Professional Activity Award is presented for excellence in planning and executing events that encourage the participation of the Institute’s young professional members, and provide opportunities for leadership at the section, regional, or national level. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Michael West, chair and young professional activities officer; Second Place: Delaware, Daniel Nice and Jeremiah Shiflet, young professional activities officers.

    Medium: Honorable Mention: Cape Canaveral, Anne Caraccio, young professional activities officer; Honorable Mention: Tucson, Aaron Powers and Eric Hoffman-Watt, young professional activities officers.
      Large: First Place: Phoenix, M. Brett McMickell, at large representative; Second Place: Atlanta, Leihong Li, young professional activities officer; Honorable Mention: San Diego,Jonathan Blackler, young professional activities officer.

    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Robert Mitchell, young professional activities officer; Honorable Mention: Hampton Roads, Jeremy Pinier and John Wells, young professional activities officers.

     

    The Outstanding Activity Award allows the Institute to acknowledge sections that held an outstanding activity deserving of additional recognition. The winners are:

     

    Very Small: (tie) Sydney, Michael West, section chair. Aerospace Futures Conference.This conference brought together university students from across Australia with representatives from the Australian and international space industry to discuss current research, careers, and future prospects in the aerospace sector. The Sydney Section sponsored the event and Dr. Michael West delivered a keynote address on the first day of the conference. It was entitled “How to Survive and Thrive as a Rocket Scientist in Australia and Beyond”. As part of the conference, the Section also hosted an evening public panel discussion on the roles of government and industry in Australia’s nascent space sector.

    Very Small (tie): China Lake, Ying-Ming Lee section chair. 50 Years of AIAA at China Lake. The section celebrated its 50th anniversary with a special celebration honoring both the history of the Section and its members. The program began with a presentation by Section officer, Jeff Scott, followed by an award ceremony for members with special focus on five individuals who have been AIAA members for 50 years. Capping off the evening was a multi-media presentation by guest speaker, Wallace Martin. Inspired by the recently installed AIAA Historic Aerospace Site plaques, this presentation featured pictures, videos, and personal stories highlighting the most important contributions made by scientists and engineers at China Lake in the history of the facility.

    Small: Northwest Florida, Ben Dickenson, section chair. Eglin Air Force Base Flightline Tour.The Section organized and led an educational tour of Eglin AFB with the first state-funded STEM Center. Seventy-three students and ten chaperones learned about the F-35, F-15 and F-16, with an emphasis on the use of electromagnetic spectrum for flying operations. While touring the aircraft the students were placed in teams of five to answer a 20-question quiz. The questions were created by AIAA members to encourage critical thinking with respect to aircraft design characteristics. The quizzes were graded and the top two teams were awarded prizes.

    Medium: Central Florida, Randel Allen, section chair. Wings ’n’ Things This was a STEM K–12 event held at the Florida Air Museum at Sun ’n’ Fun in Leesburg, FL, in which Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and their sisters built and flew model rockets. Approximately 300 youth took part in this full-day event. In the morning session, they built their model rockets. After lunch, they launched their rockets, some multiple times – until they ran out of engines. A few Section members and several AIAA/UCF students participated in this full-day activity.

     

    Large: Northern Ohio, Kevin Melcher, section chair. Young Astronauts Day. The Section, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Sierra Lobo Inc. hosted 350 (15 middle/high school teams and 15 elementary teams) from 19 different communities and schools for the 20th Anniversary edition of Young Astronauts Day. Throughout the day-long event, students were challenged with various hands-on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activities. Demand for participation in this event is high – the 30 slots fill fast and there is always a waiting list!

    Very Large (tie): Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Nicola Sarzi Amade, programs officer. Annual Awards Dinner and Book Signing. This dinner had the largest attendance in recent Section history with 259 people participating. As a result of this dinner, the Section recruited 2 new professional members and 24 new student members. The guest speakers were Buzz Aldrin and Francis French. They had a book signing event for “Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration” by Buzz Aldrin and two books by Francis French, “Into That Silent Sea” and “In the Shadow of the Moon”. The event was both successful and profitable.

    Very Large (tie): Greater Huntsville, Tom Kmiec, section chair. Civil Space Symposium. This symposium, held for the first time, was billed as “Civil Space 2013: Accelerating Tomorrow’s Commercial Space Marketplace”. It was a two-day event to bring together government and industry to discuss the mutual goal of efficient, effective, and reliable access for payload and crew to near Earth Space. The conference was unique in that the focus was not on exploration, but on Earth orbital concerns and solutions. It served as a working level conference designed to highlight some of the biggest challenges facing the market today, including technology gap, market stability, obsolescence, and integration and safety standards.

     

    AIAA is the world’s largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession. With more than 35,000 individual members worldwide, and nearly 100 corporate members, AIAA brings together industry, academia, and government to advance engineering and science in aviation, space, and defense. For more information, visit www.aiaa.org.


    ###


     

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Suite 500, Reston, VA 20191-4344
    Phone: 703.264.7558 Fax: 703.264.7551 www.aiaa.org