AIAA

The World's Forum for Aerospace Leadership

  • MY AIAA
  • Donate
  • Press Room
  • Renew
  • View Cart
The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)

is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession.

    • ARC
    • AIAA Foundation
    • Industry Guide

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    CONTACT: DUANE HYLAND
    703.264.7558
    duaneh@aiaa.org

     

    AIAA ANNOUNCES 2013-2014 SECTION AWARD WINNERS
    Awards Honor Outstanding Section Programming in a Variety of Categories


    August 8, 2014 – Reston, Va. – The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) has announced its 2013–2014 Section Award winners. The Section Awards annually honor particularly notable achievements made by member sections in a range of activities that help fulfill the Institute’s mission. The Institute believes that vital, active sections are essential to its success.

    Section awards are made annually in five categories based on size of membership. Each winning section receives a certificate and a cash award – $500 for first place, $200 for second, and $100 for third. The award period covered is June 1, 2013 through May 30, 2014.

    The Outstanding Section Award is presented to sections based upon their overall activities and contributions through the year. The winners are:


      Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Michael West, section chair; Second Place: Delaware, Eric Spero, section chair; Third Place: China Lake, Randy Drobny, section chair.
    Small: First Place: Savannah, Chris Kabureck, section chair; Second Place: Northwest Florida, Ben Dickinson, section chair; Third Place (tie): Twin Cities: Kristen Gerzina, section chair; Third Place (tie): Northeastern New York: Eric Ruggiero, section chair.
    Medium: First Place: Long Island, David Paris, section chair; Second Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, section chair;
      Third Place: Michigan, Thomas Mirowski, section chair.
    Large: First Place: Northern Ohio, Kevin Melcher, section chair; Second Place: Phoenix, Rob Trepa, section chair; Third Place: Orange County, Gene Justin, section chair.
    Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, Eric Walker, section chair; Second Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Oliver Leembruggen, section chair; Third Place (tie): Greater Huntsville, Ram Ramachandran, section chair; Third Place (tie): National Capital, Supriya Banerjee, section chair.

     

    The Career and Workforce Development Award is presented for section activities that focus on career development, such as time management workshops, career transition workshops, job benefits workshops, and technical versus management career path workshops. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Michael Spencer,
    career and workforce development officer.

     

    The Communication Award recognizes sections that develop and implement an outstanding communications outreach program. Winning criteria include level of complexity, timeliness, and variety of methods of communications, as well as frequency, format, and content of the communications outreach. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Daniel Sutton and Daniel Nice, webmasters; Second Place: Sydney, Rounak Manoharan, secretary and Amelia Greig, membership officer; Third Place: China Lake, Jeffrey Scott, communications officer and vice chair.
    Small: First Place: Twin Cities, Andrew Carlson, webmaster; Second Place: Savannah, Johnna Bussell, communications officer.
    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, chair; Second Place: Long Island, David Paris, chair and newsletter editor;
      Third Place: Michigan, Dustin Moyer, communications officer. Large: First Place: Northern Ohio, Edmond Wong, communications officer; Second Place: San Diego, Cesar Martin, secretary; Third Place: Cape Canaveral, Jennifer Holland, communications officer.
    Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, John Lin, newsletter editor; Second Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Michael List, secretary and newsletter editor; Third Place: Houston, Michael Martin, chair-elect.

     

    The Membership Award is presented to sections that have increased their membership by planning and implementing effective recruitment and retention campaigns. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: First Place: Delaware, David Rosenberg, membership officer; Second Place: Sydney, Amelia Greig, membership officer; Third Place: China Lake, Jeff Scott, vice chair and membership officer.
    Small: First Place: Twin Cities, Christopher Sanden, vice chair and membership officer; Second Place: Savannah, Adam Hart, membership officer. Medium: First Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, chair.
      Large: First Place: Cape Canaveral, Taylor Dacko, membership officer; Second Place: Orange County, Bob Welge, membership chair; Third Place: Phoenix, Rick Kale, membership officer.
    Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, Marlyn Andino, membership officer; Second Place: Los Angeles/ Las Vegas, Nicola Sarzi-Amade and Sy Ferdman, membership officers: Third Place: Dayton-Cincinnati, Tim Cleaver, membership officer.
    The Harry Staubs Precollege Outreach Award is presented to sections that develop and implement an outstanding STEM K–12 outreach program that provides quality educational resources for K–12 teachers in the “STEM” subject areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Elishabet Lato, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Wisconsin, Todd Treichel, section chair; Third Place: Sydney, Andrew Neely, STEM K-12 outreach officer.
    Small: First Place: Savannah, Francois Hugon, Craig Willis, and Jason Riopelle, STEM K–12 outreach officers; Second Place: Northwest Florida, Tucker Hamilton, STEM K-12 outreach officer; Third Place: Utah, Rob Thue, section chair.
    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson and Michelle Rouch, STEM K-12 outreach officers; Second Place: Michigan, Michelle Clark, Education and STEM K-12 outreach officer;
      Third Place: Central Florida, Randal Allen, section chair and STEM K-12 officer. Large: First Place: Orange County, Janet Koepke, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place: Phoenix, Rob Trepa, section chair; Third Place: Northern Ohio, Julie Kleinhenz, STEM K-12 outreach officer.
    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Carl Tilmann, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Second Place (tie): Hampton Roads, Karen Berger and Shann Rufer, education and STEM K–12 outreach officers; Second Place (tie): National Capital Section, Supriya Banerjee, section chair.

     

    The Public Policy Award is presented for stimulating public awareness of the needs and benefits of aerospace research and development, particularly on the part of government representatives, and for educating section members about the value of public policy activities. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: First Place: China Lake, Steve Goad, public policy officer; Second Place: Delaware Timothy Dominick, public policy officer; Third Place: Sydney, Amelia Greig, membership officer.
    Small: First Place: Utah, Ron Thue, section chair.
    Medium: First Place: Long Island, Frank Hayes, public policy officer; Second Place: Michigan, Bob Everett, public policy officer; Third Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, section chair.
      Large: First Place: Orange County: Kamal Shweyk, public policy officer; Second Place: Northern Ohio, Amber Abbott-Hearn, public policy officer; Third Place: Phoenix, Rob Trepa, section chair.
    Very Large: First Place: Dayton-Cincinnati, Mike White, public policy officer; Second Place (tie): National Capital, Supriya Banerjee, section chair; Second Place (tie): Hampton Roads, Lena Little and Melissa Carter, public policy officers.

     

    The Young Professional Activity Award is presented for excellence in planning and executing events that encourage the participation of the Institute’s young professional members, and provide opportunities for leadership at the section, regional, or national level. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: First Place: Sydney, Arnab Dasgupta, young professional activities officer, Second Place: Delaware, Daniel Nice, young professional activities officer.

    Small: First Place: Savannah, Kyle Finnegan and Ryan Vas, young professional activities officers.

    Medium: First Place: Tucson, Eric Hoffman-Watt, young professional activities officer; Second Place: Tennessee, Henry Horne, young professional activities officer.
      Large: First Place: Northern Ohio, Roger Tokars, young professional activities officer; Second Place: Cape Canaveral, Anthony Mansk, young professional activities officer; Third Place: Phoenix, Joshua Loughman, young professional activities officer.
    Very Large: First Place: Dayton/Cincinnati, Robert Mitchell, young professional activities officer; Second Place: National Capital, Scott Fry, young professional activities officer; Third Place: Hampton Roads, John Wells, young professional activities officer.

     

    The Outstanding Activity Award allows the Institute to acknowledge sections that have held an outstanding activity deserving of additional recognition. The winners are:

     

      Very Small: Adelaide, Matthew Tetlow, section chair. ISS – International Young Professionals Panel. The panel was made up of a group of young professionals: Andrea Boyd, ISS Operator at the European Astronaut Centre, Kathleen Coderre, Systems Engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Centre, and Maria Kuleshova, Technical Engineer, from Moscow. They each talked about their country’s ISS experience and human spaceflight program, together with the selection process to become an astronaut. Following their talks, there was a question and answer period to ask about the ISS and the path that each young professional has taken in their career.

    Small: Northwest Florida, Ben Dickenson, section chair. Exploring Mars. The NW Florida Section of AIAA organized and led a lecture series from NASA Engineer Bobak Ferdowsi. Mr. Ferdowsi was a ground level engineer on the Mars Curiosity Rover program. He also entered into pop-culture when he famously wore a Mohawk in the control room during the initial landing of the Curiosity Rover. He quickly became known as the ‘Mohawk Engineer’ and became the voice of the program. Mr. Ferdowsi was brought in by the local section and provided three lectures in one day. The first lecture was just for local students where more than 1100 students showed up to learn about the NASA program. The second event was held for the award winning Niceville High School Robotics Club. This event was an intimate lunch with Mr. Ferdowsi and 15 students. The third event was a more technical briefing provided by Mr. Ferdowsi to AIAA members and other space enthusiasts on Eglin AFB. This briefing was attended by 105 professionals and was well received.

    Medium: Michigan, Thomas Mirowski, section chair. Rocket Labs. Engineers from the Michigan section built and launched real rockets from Estes Rockets with students at K-12 schools. A team of two visited each class to give a brief presentation on rocketry and then build and launch rockets with a rocket for every 2-3 children. The presentations demonstrated details surrounding the rockets history, importance, and science and math. The members also shared stories on how they became engineers and what they do at their jobs. The rockets were provided by a grant from AIAA and the Michigan Section. The number of students exposed to aerospace as a career as well as the positive experience that the engineers and teachers had will certainly make the event worth repeating and expanding next year.
      Large: Orange County, Joseph Justin, section chair. Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) and Rocketry Club. The Orange County Section sponsorship of TARC was part of the Section’s STEM and Educational Outreach program. TARC is an international rocketry contest. The Orange County section mentored 10 teams that designed, built & flew a rocket to 825 feet, in timed flight carrying two raw eggs. The competition was open to 7th through 12th graders. The top 100 teams competed in Washington DC. The Orange County Section mentored teams from 13 cities and 16 schools.

    In addition, the Section actively supports the AIAA Orange County Rocketry club. The rocketry club is for all ages but aimed at getting youth involved with science, engineering and technology through rocketry. The club meets once each month and has at least one launch outing each month. Students begin by building commercial kits, then go on to design and build rockets using a Computer Aided Design program.

    Very Large (tie): Greater Huntsville, Ram Ramachandran, section chair. National Engineers Week. The Greater Huntsville Section organized a week full of activities. They conducted activities to promote STEM for each phase of educational development (K-12, College, YP, Professional). They held a panel of Young Professionals (YP) on the topic of Additive Manufacturing at AIAA's Technical Committee on Management (TCM). They also held a YP mixer with members of the AIAA TCM which was well attended. Additional activities included a tour of United Launch Alliance’s manufacturing facility in Decatur, Alabama. The section and the University of Alabama in Huntsville Student Branch co-hosted a lecture by Dr. Mark Tischler, Army Senior Technologist at Ames Research Center and they also co-hosted the 20th Annual Great Paper Airplane Contest.

    Very Large (tie): Pacific Northwest, Kimberly Hicks, section chair. Rising Leaders Forum. This Technical Symposium brings many professionals together from across their disciplines. The Rising Leaders Forum provides an opportunity for young professionals (YPs) to have special professional growth opportunities and to create a community of YPs passionate about aerospace engineering. The Forum included a standing-room only presentation discussing Professional Development in a Changing Aerospace Environment and recommendations for today’s rising leaders to become successful. As part of this event, the AIAA YPs were invited to participate in the speed mentoring portion of the program.

     

    AIAA is the largest aerospace professional society in the world, serving a diverse range of more than 35,000 individual members from 80 countries, and 100 corporate members. AIAA members help make the world safer, more connected, more accessible, and more prosperous. For more information, visit www.aiaa.org, or follow us on Twitter @AIAA.


    ###


     

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Suite 500, Reston, VA 20191-4344
    Phone: 703.264.7558 Fax: 703.264.7551 www.aiaa.org