AIAA

The World's Forum for Aerospace Leadership

  • MY AIAA
  • Donate
  • Press Room
  • Renew
  • View Cart
The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)

is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession.

    • AIAA Governance
    • ARC
    • AIAA Foundation
    • Industry Guide

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    CONTACT: John Blacksten
    703.264.7532
    johnb@aiaa.org

     

    AIAA Announces Section Award Winners
    Awards Honor Outstanding Section Programming in a Variety of Categories

    September 7, 2016 – Reston, Va. – The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) has announced its 2015–2016 Section Award winners. The Section Awards honor particularly notable achievements made by member sections in a range of activities that help fulfill the Institute’s mission. The Institute believes that vital, active sections are essential to its success.

    Section awards are given annually in five categories based on the size of each section’s membership. Each winning section receives a certificate and a cash award — $500 for first place, $200 for second and $100 for third. The award period covered is June 1, 2015 – May 31, 2016.

    The Outstanding Section Award is presented to sections based upon their overall activities and contributions through the year. The winners are:



    • Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Breanne Sutton, section chair; Second Place: Adelaide, Mark Ramsey, section chair; Third Place: China Lake, Jeff Scott, section chair


    • Small: First Place: Sydney, Evan Smith, section chair; Second Place: Savannah, Jason Riopelle, section chair; Third Place (tie): Twin Cities, Kristen Gerzina, section chair; Third Place (tie): Vandenberg, Keegan McCoy, section chair


    • Medium: First Place, Tucson, Brian Biswell, section chair; Second Place: Long Island, David Paris, section chair; Third Place: Southwest Texas, Joan Labay-Marquez, section chair; Honorable Mention: Wichita, Mike Brennison, section chair


    • Large: First Place: San Diego, Katherine Kucharski, section chair; Second Place: Northern Ohio, James Gilland, section chair; Third Place: Orange County, Amir S. Gohardani, section chair
    • Very Large: First Place: Greater Huntsville, Kurt Polzin, section chair; Second Place: Hampton Roads, Craig Hutchinson, section chair; Third Place: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Jeff Puschell, section chair; Honorable Mention: Dayton/Cincinnati, Michael List, section chair


    The Career and Professional Development Award is presented for section activities that focus on career development, such as time management workshops, career transition workshops, job benefits workshops, and technical versus management career path workshops. The winners are:



    • Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Timothy McCardell, career and professional development officer


    • Small: First Place: Sydney, Andrew Gong, career and professional development officer; Second Place: Savannah, Jason Riopelle, section chair


    • Medium: First Place (tie): Tucson, Jeff Jepson, Regional Activities Committee representative; First Place (tie): Southwest Texas, Joan Labay-Marquez, section chair


    • Large: Second Place: Northern Ohio, James Gilland, section chair; Third Place: San Diego, Ioana Broome, section vice chair


    • Very Large: Second Place: Greater Huntsville, Jesse Jones, continuing education and career and professional development officer and Kurt Polzin, section chair


    The Communications Award is presented to sections that have developed and implemented an outstanding communications outreach program. Winning criteria include level of complexity, timeliness, and variety of methods of communications, as well as frequency, format, and content of the communication outreach. The winners are:



    • Very Small: First Place; Delaware, Joseph Scroggins, communications chair; Second Place: China Lake, Jeff Scott, communications chair


    • Small: First Place: Sydney, Evan Smith, section chair; Second Place: Savannah,Chris Kabureck, communications officer; Third Place: Twin Cities, Andrew Carlson, webmaster and Chris Sanden, secretary and membership officer


    • Medium: First Place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, STEM outreach officer and Michelle Rouch, aerospace and societies officer; Second Place: Long Island, Dave Paris, chair and newsletter editor; Third Place: Central Florida, Josh Giffin, secretary


    • Large: First Place: Northern Ohio, Edmond Wong, communications officer; Second Place: Albuquerque, Sally Smith, newsletter editor; Third Place: San Diego, Stevie Jacobson, secretary


    • Very Large: First Place: Greater Huntsville, Kurt Polzin, section chair; Arloe Mayne, webmaster and Gabe Xu, newsletter editor. Second Place: Hampton Roads, John Lin, newsletter editor


    The Membership Award is presented to sections that have increased their membership by planning and implementing effective recruitment and retention campaigns. The winners are:


    • Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Di Ena Davis, membership officer; Second Place: China Lake, Jeff Scott, membership officer


    • Small: First Place: Twin Cities, Kristen Gerzina, section chair; Second Place: Savannah, Chris Kabureck, membership and communications officer


    • Medium: First Place: Tucson, Rajka Corder, membership officer; Second Place: Central Florida, Josh Giffin, membership officer


    • Large: First Place: Orange County, Bob Welge, vice chair membership; Second Place (tie): San Diego, Brian Quan, membership officer; Second Place (tie): Cape Canaveral, Tristan Clouse, membership officer


    • Very Large: First Place: Greater Huntsville, Roger Herdy, membership officer and Kurt Polzin, section chair; Second Place: Hampton Roads, Troy Lake and Marlyn Andino, membership co-chairs; Third Place: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Rick Garcia, membership officer


    The STEM K–12 Award is presented to sections that have developed and implemented an outstanding STEM K–12 outreach program that provides quality education resources for K–12 teachers in the STEM subject areas. The winners are:


    • Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Elishabet Lato, STEM K–12 outreach officer


    • Small: First Place: Northwest Florida, Angela Diggs, vice chair; Second Place: Vandenberg, Tom Stevens, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place: Savannah, Alex Rummel, STEM K–12 outreach officer


    • Medium: First place: Tucson, Elishka Jepson, STEM K–12 outreach officer and Michelle Rouch, aerospace and societies officer; Second Place: Southwest Texas, Joan Labay-Marquez, STEM K–12 outreach officer


    • Large: First Place: Orange County, Jann Koepke, vice chair, education; Second Place: San Diego, Chris McEachin, student activities coordinator; Third Place (tie): Cape Canaveral, Brian Kaplinger, STEM K–12 outreach officer; Third Place (tie): Northern Ohio, Julie Kleinhenz, STEM K–12 outreach officer


    • Very Large: First Place: Hampton Roads, Karen Berger and Shann Rufer, education/pre-college committee co-chairs; Second Place: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Dana Puschell, programs chair; Third Place (tie): Greater Huntsville, Megan Beattie, pre-college outreach officer and Kurt Polzin, section chair; Third Place (tie): Houston, Alan Sisson, Chair


    The
    Public Policy Award
    is presented for stimulating public awareness of the needs of aerospace research and development, particularly on the part of government representatives, and for education section members about the value of public policy activities. The winners are:


    • Very Small: First Place: Delaware, Tim Dominick, public policy officer; Second Place: Adelaide, Mark Ramsey, section chair


    • Small: First Place: First Place: Twin Cities, Josh Borchardt, public policy officer; Second Place: Savannah, Ted Meyer, public policy officer


    • Medium: First Place: Tucson, Matthew Anguilo, public policy officer; Second Place: Central Florida, Jason Hopkins, public policy officer


    • Large: First Place: Atlanta, Steven Justice, public policy officer; Second Place: Northern Ohio, Amber Abbott-Hearn, public policy officer; Third Place: Cape Canaveral,Jarvis Hudson, public policy officer


    • Very Large: First Place: Greater Huntsville, Robert LaBranche, public policy officer; Second Place: Hampton Roads, Steven Dunn, public policy officer; Third Place: Los Angeles/Las Vegas, Michael Todaro, public policy officer


    The Young Professional Activity Award is presented for excellence in planning and executing events that encourage the participation of the Institute’s young professional members, and provide opportunities for leadership at the section, regional, or national level. The winners are:


    • Very Small: First Place: Delaware section, Daniel Nice, young professional officer


    • Small: First Place: Sydney, Mathew Vella, vice chair – technical


    • Large: First Place (tie): Northern Ohio, Roger Tokars, young professional officer; First Place (tie): San Diego, Marjorie Rima, young professional officer


    • Very Large: First Place: Greater Huntsville, Cody Crofford, young professional officer


    The Outstanding Activity Award allows the Institute to acknowledge sections that held an outstanding activity deserving of additional recognition. The winners are:


    • Very Small: Adelaide, Mark Ramsey, section chair. “Space Entrepreneurs: The Rewards and the Risks.” The AIAA Adelaide Section teamed up with the International Space University and University of South Australia to co-host a major public event titled “Space Entrepreneurs: The Rewards and Risks.” The event included five Australian entrepreneurs who have been involved in space startups in the last few years to help showcase local industry entrepreneurship, including two AIAA Adelaide Section members. Each of the five speakers gave a presentation about how they came to entrepreneurship in space, followed by a panel discussion with many interesting questions from the audience. As the event was also streamed live over the Internet, questions were taken from Twitter across the globe. The event was introduced by Dr. John Connolly, who is the director of the Space Studies Program at the International Space University, and former chief exploration scientist at NASA. Dr. Connolly introduced Mark Ramsey, AIAA Adelaide Section chair, who was the moderator for the event. The event was enjoyed by a crowd of over 150 people, including the current Southern Hemisphere Space Studies Program 2016 International Student group.


    • Small: Niagara Frontier, Walter Gordon, section chair. New Horizons Interplanetary Mission to Pluto. The AIAA Niagara Frontier Section hosted a dinner meeting and lecture in conjunction with the Aero Club of Buffalo and Buffalo Astronomical Association. There were over 150 in attendance including teachers and students from dozens of local schools in Erie and Niagara counties, all participants in the Student Spaceflight Experiment Program (SSEP). Alice Bowman, mission operation manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for the new mission to Pluto, was the speaker. Ms. Bowman discussed the challenges of the mission, including the nine years it took the spacecraft to reach Pluto and its next potential goal of reaching a small Kuiper Belt object (KBO) known as 2014 MU69 that orbits nearly a billion miles beyond Pluto.


    • Medium: Tennessee, Joe Sheeley, section chair. Rocketday! This was the first of an annual event celebrating rocketry and the aerospace science profession in general. It was held at the Hands-On Science Center in Tullahoma and included activities and competitions for the students, displays, and speakers. The activities for K–5th graders were straw rocket building, rocket coloring, and face painting. The competitions for 3th–8th graders included soda bottle rockets and match head rockets, and for 7th–12th graders “Cool-Two” two-liter rocket Design/Build/Fly. The objective of this last competition was to build the coolest rocket with a two-liter bottle and other things people would throw away, such as paint, stickers, rubber bands, string, and glue. Judging was based on looks, engineering/design, flight radicality, and style.


    • Large: Cape Canaveral, Dave Fleming, section chair. AIAA Cape Canaveral Section Spring Banquet. The 2016 Spring Banquet was held at the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum in Titusville, FL, which has a collection of over 45 historic aircraft (C-47, A-6, F-4J, F-86 to name a few), several of which are maintained in flying condition, housed in two large hangars and in exterior display. Students from Florida Institute of Technology were able to fly their small airplane to the event and park it on the tarmac for display just outside the hangar housing the banquet. In addition to being able to tour the museum, one of the three AIAA Cape Canaveral Section Science Fair Award winners displayed her winning science fair project, along with three science fair projects from K–12 students of the Weiss School in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. A large contingent of students and parents (50 total, including 36 students) from the Weiss School traveled by bus to participate in this meeting. These students also made a brief presentation about their activities prior to dinner. The featured speaker was Captain Judy Rice of Think Global Flight who had recently concluded a round-the-world flight stopping in 25 countries to promote STEM education.


    • Very Large: Dayton/Cincinnati section, Michael List, section chair. Dayton-Cincinnati Aerospace Sciences Symposium (DCASS). The AIAA Dayton‐Cincinnati Aerospace Sciences Symposium has provided a unique venue for technical interchange with members of our regional aerospace community for over four decades. The 41st AIAA DCASS saw 236 registrants and 157 technical presentations. With a large professional attendance, students and Young Professionals received feedback from nationally recognized experts and observed professional briefings prior to major conferences. The student attendance was invaluable to the professionals as well. The keynote session included opening remarks by Allen Arrington, AIAA vice president – standards on the AIAA governance changes. The invited keynote speaker was Lt. Col. Tucker “Cinco” Hamilton, an AIAA distinguished lecturer. His presentation, "Making a Difference at Mach 2.0," addressed his time as a U.S. Air Force Test Pilot and his view on how to live life. This year’s symposium once again showcased cutting‐edge research with a one‐day program with technical presentations across multiple areas of aerospace science and technology.


     

    About AIAA
    AIAA is the largest aerospace professional society in the world, serving a diverse range of more than 30,000 individual members from 88 countries, and 95 corporate members. AIAA members help make the world safer, more connected, more accessible, and more prosperous. For more information, visit www.aiaa.org, or follow us on Twitter @AIAA.


    ###


     

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    12700 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite 200, Reston, VA 20191-5807
    Phone: 703.264.7558 Fax: 703.264.7551 www.aiaa.org