CFD for Combustion Modeling

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CFD for Combustion Modeling

Synopsis:

The objective of the course is to provide the interested combustion engineer or researcher with the fundamentals of combustion modeling to assess a combustion problem and to decide on the adequate models to be used in numerical simulations. The course is designed to also provide the knowledge to implement certain models into CFD codes. The course starts with fundamentals of combustion chemistry and includes a hands-on introduction to a 0D/1D combustion code. This is followed by a brief introduction to statistical models and turbulence modeling. A comparative overview of the most commonly used combustion models will be given next. Implementation issues and application examples will be discussed. Special topics include combustion instabilities, combustion in aircraft engines, augmentors, and high-speed combustion.

Key Topics:

  • CFD for Turbulence
  • Chemical Kinetics Modeling
  • CFD approaches for Turbulent Combustion
  • Modeling for Turbulent Combustion
  • Emission and Instability Modeling
  • Application to Gas Turbines, Augmentors and Scramjets 

Who Should Attend:

The objective of the course is to provide the interested combustion engineer or researcher with the fundamentals of combustion modeling to assess a combustion problem and to decide on the adequate models to use in numerical simulations. The course is designed to also provide the knowledge to implement certain models into CFD codes with applications to aircraft engines, augmentors, and high-speed combustion.

Course Information:

Type of Course: Instructor-Led Short Course
Course Level: Intermediate/Advanced


Course scheduling available in the following format:


  • Course at Conference
  • On-site Course
  • Standalone/Public Course

Course Length: 2 days
AIAA CEU's available: yes

Outline


Course Outline:


I. Introduction, overview, problem definition, and examples
II. Combustion chemistry and reduced mechanisms
III. The FlameMaster chemistry package
IV. Turbulence and statistical methods, analysis of time-dependant data
V. Combustion models overview: (EBU/EDC, assumed PDF, scalar PDF, Flamelet, Flame Surface Density, Linear-eddy, etc)
VI. Flamelet models for non-premixed turbulent combustion
VII. Flamelet models for premixed turbulent combustion
VIII. Applications of the presented models and implementation details
IX. Subgrid Scalar Mixing and Combustion Modeling: the linear-eddy model, subgrid FPDF, etc)
X. The Linear-eddy mixing model package, implementation details, and cost/accuracy issues
XI. Combustion in CFD for Gas Turbine Combustors
XII. Combustion in CFD for Augmentors and Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames
XIII. Special Topics: Emission Modeling, Low-NOx combustor modeling
XIV. Special Topics: Combustion Instability and Lean Blowout modeling
XV. Special Topics: CFD of Spray Combustion in Gas Turbines
XVI. Special Topics: CFD of Ramjets and Scramjet Combustion

 

Materials

Course Materials:


Since course notes will not be distributed onsite, AIAA and your course instructor highly recommend that you bring your computer with the course notes already downloaded to the course. 

Once you have registered for the course, these course notes are available about two weeks prior to the course event, and remain available to you in perpetuity. 

 

Instructors

Course Instructors:


Professor Heinz Pitsch’s work is in computational energy sciences and includes modeling of combustion processes using large-eddy simulation, combustion chemistry and chemistry reduction for transportation fuel surrogates, soot formation, and modeling of liquid atomization and sprays with application to gas turbine engines, furnaces, and internal combustion engines. He works also on electrocatalysis and transport in porous media with application to fuel cells.

Professor Suresh Menon’s area of expertise is in large-eddy simulation of turbulent non-reacting and reacting flows. He has developed unique simulation capabilities to study turbulent mixing and combustion in gaseous and liquid-fueled gas turbine and rocket motors, as well as for ramjet/scramjet engines.