Missile Aerodynamics, Propulsion, and Guidance

In This Section

Overview

This in-depth online course will cover the most important aspects of missile aerodynamics, propulsion, and guidance. The prediction methods presented in the course are generally simple closed-form analytical expressions that are physics-based, to provide better insight into the primary driving parameters. Typical values of missile parameters and the characteristics of current operational missiles are discussed as well as the enabling subsystems, technologies, and the current/projected state-of-the-art. Multiple videos throughout the lectures illustrate missile system and subsystems development activities.

Learning Objectives

  •  Key drivers in the missile aerodynamic, propulsion, and guidance design and system engineering process
  • Critical tradeoffs, methods, and technologies in missile selection and sizing to meet flight performance and other requirements
  • Conceptual design prediction methods
  • Launch platform-missile configuration integration
  • Aerodynamic, Propulsion, and Guidance sizing examples to meet missile performance requirements
  • Missile aerodynamics, propulsion, and guidance development process
  • Targeting system, launch platform, and missile guidance integration
  • Detailed outline below

Who Should Attend
The course is oriented toward the needs of missile engineers, system engineers, system analysts, program managers, university professors, and others working in the area of missile systems and missile technology development.

Contact: Please contact Jason Cole (jasonc@aiaa.org) or Customer Service if you have any questions about the course or group discounts.
Outline
Lectures 1-2: Missile Aerodynamics

Methods are shown for predicting drag, normal force, pitching moment, static margin, and hinge moment. Aerodynamic flight control alternatives (canard, wing, tail), propulsion flight control alternatives (thrust vector flight control, reaction jet flight control), aerodynamic stabilizer alternatives, maneuver law alternatives, and wing sizing are discussed. Sizing examples are presented for maximizing aerodynamic flight performance of rocket-powered missiles, ramjet-powered missiles, turbo-jet powered missiles, and guided bombs. Examples of the state-of-the-art in missile aerodynamics, typical values of missile aerodynamic parameters, and the characteristics of current operational missiles are presented. Launch platform integration includes aircraft, ship, and ground vehicles. The missile aerodynamics development process includes design validation/technology development, development tests, and test facilities.

  • Introduction/Drivers in Missile Aerodynamics
  • Missile Aerodynamic Design, Development, and System Engineering
  • Propulsion Considerations in Missile Aerodynamics
  • Weight Considerations in Missile Aerodynamics
  • Flight Performance Considerations in Missile Aerodynamics
  • Other Measures of Merit and Launch Platform Integration/System Engineering Considerations in Missile Aerodynamics
  • Missile Aerodynamic Sizing Examples and Sizing Tools
  • Missile Aerodynamics Development Process
Lectures 3-4: Missile Propulsion

Typical values of missile propulsion parameters and the characteristics of current operational missiles are discussed as well as the enabling subsystems and technologies and the current/projected state-of-the-art. Sizing examples are presented for rocket-powered, ramjet-powered, and turbo-jet powered missiles. Turbojet engine information includes design considerations, sizing, turbine materials, compressor alternatives, and inlet-launch platform integration. Ramjet information includes selecting ramjet engine, booster, and inlet alternatives, ramjet performance prediction, and high-density fuels. Solid propellant rocket motor information includes performance prediction, design tradeoffs, manufacturing, propellant alternatives, propellant grain cross section, thrust magnitude control, observables, lifetime prediction, combustion instability, motor case/nozzle materials, and insulation materials. Ducted rocket information includes performance prediction and design tradeoffs. Comparisons are presented of propulsion thrust vector and reaction jet flight control versus aerodynamic flight control.

  • Introduction/Drivers in Missile Propulsion
  • Aerodynamic Considerations in Missile Propulsion
  • Propulsion Considerations in Missile Design, Development, and System Engineering
  • Weight Considerations in Missile Propulsion
  • Flight Performance Considerations in Missile Propulsion
  • Other Measures of Merit and Launch Platform Integration Considerations in Missile Propulsion
  • Missile Propulsion Sizing Examples and Sizing Tools
  • Missile Propulsion Development Process
Lectures 5-6: Missile Guidance

Typical values of missile guidance parameters and the characteristics of current operational missiles are discussed as well as the enabling subsystems and technologies and the current/projected state-of-the-art. Seeker/sensor/data link alternatives include radar, infrared, and laser. Seeker robustness considerations include performance with adverse weather, clutter, automatic target recognition, and countermeasures. Navigation alternatives include Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial reference. Flight control alternatives include tail, canard, wing, thrust vector, and reaction jet control. Carriage and fire control interfaces are presented for aircraft, ground vehicle, and ship launch platforms. Discussion of guidance simulation includes conceptual design modeling, preliminary design modeling, and hardware-in-loop modeling. The missile guidance development process, test facilities, and development tests are presented.

  • Introduction/Drivers in Missile Guidance
  • Aerodynamic Considerations in Missile Guidance
  • Weight Considerations in Missile Guidance
  • Flight Performance Considerations in Missile Guidance
  • Other Measures of Merit and Launch Platform Integration/System Engineering Considerations in Missile Guidance
  • Missile Guidance Accuracy and Sizing Tools
  • Missile Guidance Development Process
Instructors
Eugene L. Fleeman has 50+ years of government, industry, academia, and consulting experience in the design and development of missile systems. Formerly a manager of missile programs at the US Air Force Research Laboratory, Rockwell International, Boeing, and Georgia Tech, he is an international lecturer on missiles and the author of 200+ publications, including three textbooks. His textbooks and short courses on Missile Design, Development, and System Engineering emphasize physics-based prediction methods, for enhanced insight, speed, and accuracy to the conceptual design process. Since the year 1999 his short course has been held over 100 times in fifteen countries and five continents. Additional information is available at the web site https://sites.google.com/site/eugenefleeman/home